Angelsong is an amazing experience

Going through cancer and chemotherapy leaves most people with some battle scars – both those you can see and those you cannot – and there is often a heightened sense of anxiety at times.  During my own journey,  I have explored all sorts of alternative therapies including diet, herbal supplements, yoga, meditation, and music.  All of them have been very positive experiences for me.  I am open to just about any alternative idea that does not involve hallucinations or drugs.  I also believe that people cross our paths for a reason.  I have met many wonderful people in the last couple of years and one of them is Amy Robbins-Wilson.  

She literally lights up a room when she walks in and has the ability to draw people towards her.  As I’ve gotten to know her, I’ve learned that she possesses two Master’s degrees, she is a Reiki Master and Awakener, and she has the voice of an angel.  One of the more fascinating aspects about her is that she performs Angelsong Sessions for individuals and Angelsong Circles for a group of people. Ah, and what is Angelsong, you ask?  According to Amy’s website (link is below), Angelsong is “a form of energetic singing that is a combination of live a capella-inspired song and healing techniques. Amy opens transformational space through music” to assist people experiencing stress, grief, loss, or those looking for a sense of balance.  She sings over the person/people and smooths out energetic auras.   No, this is not based on science as we know it and it may sound wacky to some.  However, I have been able to experience an Angelsong session firsthand it was unlike anything I have ever experienced.  

The session began when Amy sat me down in a chair that faced a window overlooking the beautiful outdoors.  I closed my eyes and she started singing and moving about the space.  I have no idea how long I sat there because I got lost in her voice and my own meditation.   Afterwards, I felt such a sense of healing and peace.  The best analogy I can draw is that it is a spiritual yoga.  When I do yoga, I am so focused on what I’m doing and on my own breath that I cannot think of anything else and when the class is over, I feel a sense of peace.  This is the same feeling I had during and after the Angelsong session.  No anxiety, no jitters, and surprisingly, the nearly constant pain in my chest where my port had been was gone.  I have a back injury that has gotten worse over the years.  After the Angelsong session was over, my back pain was nearly gone, too.  It’s been a few days and neither pain has not come back.  I still feel centered, peaceful, and feel that I have found another method of healing.   I know, I know….some may say it’s a placebo effect or this can’t really happen because it makes no sense in the scientific world. Whatever it is, IT IS REAL.  If you get the chance, I highly recommend trying one of these sessions.  It is perfect for new moms, cancer patients, those in hospice, or anyone who needs some healing and balance.  It is one of the best therapies I have experienced and if you keep an open mind, it can help you, too.   Check her out at Amy’s website and if you’d like to hear her angelic voice, check out  Amy sings “I Remember You.”

 

 

lake yoga

Some tips on preparing food for a cancer patient

So you want to prepare some food for a cancer patient?  This can present some unique challenges if you have never been through chemo yourself. If you have been through it, this will likely be a refresher for you.  I am very much in favor of someone preparing some meals but it is very important to follow some guidelines.

1.) WASH ALL PRODUCE BEFORE CUTTING IT.  Chemotherapy compromises the immune system so it is vital that all produce be washed thoroughly before cutting it. It should be washed with a food-safe wash (a vinegar and water combination works very well).  If produce is cut first and then washed, then the bacteria on the outside has already been spread to the inside by way of the knife and it is much harder to clean.  Many oncologists discourage their patients from eating raw produce due to the difficulty in cleaning it properly.  Even if it’s going to be cooked, it is very important that the produce is properly cleaned.  If you purchased ‘triple washed’ produce, wash it again.  That stuff is usually washed in some type of bleaching chemicals. Also, do not use ingredients from any sort of buffet (e.g., salad bar, olive bar, etc.) in meals meant for a chemo patient.  The sanitation is a very real concern and it’s not worth the risk.

2.) Prepare smaller meals.  Chemotherapy wreaks havoc on one’s appetite.  It is recommended by many oncologists that patients eat more frequent but smaller meals.  This helps to provide energy and helps to stave off nausea.  Rather than preparing a big tray of lasagna, prepare a couple of smaller pans instead.  This way, the patient can heat up a smaller portion.  I recommend this even if the patient has family because chemo messes with the taste buds and it is likely that not everyone will eat the same food in the house at the same time.  In addition, fatigue sets in the more chemo a patient has and a smaller pan is easier to carry and maneuver.  Honestly, my last two cycles of chemo wore me out so much that I couldn’t even carry my laptop.  My son had to put it in the car and when I got to work, I had to request help from co-workers to carry it inside.  A big casserole or lasagna would not have been an option for me to move from the freezer to the oven.

3.) If the chemo has deadened the taste buds, go for texture.  I chose toasted pecans, almonds, walnuts, and granola.  This gave me some sense of being able to discern something while eating.  Make a batch of homemade granola and package it in small containers or baggies.  If texture isn’t appealing, it may be helpful to include some type of acidic drizzle on the side like a zippy vinaigrette.  I would drizzle a bit of vinegar on top of my soup or sautéed vegetables so that I could taste a smidge of something.

4.) Be careful with spices.  I grew up in San Antonio so I always liked spicy food.  However, during chemo, I had to tone it way down even though I had trouble tasting food.  Spices were hard on my stomach so you may want to tone down the curry and jalapeños.  You can get creative and instead of adding them to the food item itself, maybe make a cracker or biscuit with a bit of spice in it that can be served on the side.  This way,  the person can break off a piece and if it doesn’t sit well, the entire meal isn’t a waste.

Some other tips to keep in mind:

Label everything.  List the ingredients and how to prepare it (temperature, time, etc.).  Even if seems logical that chicken noodle casserole has chicken and noodles in it, there may be other ingredients in it that may be a concern to the patient over time like some spices or garlic or even milk (chemo makes it hard for some people to break down milk products).  For me, I couldn’t stand peanut butter or chocolate.  I didn’t have an allergy but I really could not stand the taste of either and I had loved both prior to chemo.  And even though I’ve made lasagna all my life, my lasagna may not be made the same way you would make it. Spell it all out and how to warm it/cook it/prepare it.  This will also allow the caregivers who are cooking-challenged as well the kids to be able to help.

Think outside the box for meals:

  • Make a soup but deconstruct it if needed.  For example, make a broth-based soup.  Cook pasta separately, drain, and drizzle with olive oil to keep it from sticking together.  Package the cooked pasta in a ziploc baggie, put the soup in a separate container, and have some crostini or croutons in another baggie. (I mention broth-based to reiterate that milk may be a problem for the person undergoing chemo.)
  • Make the fixins for a burger quesadilla.  Stay with me here because this is actually fun and tasty.  Cook up the ground meat and/or veggies (no need to make patties).  Shred some cheese, lettuce, tomatoes, etc.  Package the meat in one container, the toppings in another, and add a bag of tortillas.  All that needs to be done to prepare them is to warm up the meat/cooked veggies (the microwave will do just fine) and then load the tortilla with the ingredients, fold it in half, and cook it in a skillet on both sides until the cheese melts.  Everyone can fix it his/her own way.
  • Instead of making a big 3 lb meatloaf, make meatloaf muffins by cooking the meatloaf in muffin tins instead.  Make a batch of scalloped potatoes the same way.  Pop ’em out, put them on a baking sheet, and freeze as individuals.  They can then be placed in ziploc baggies and labeled accordingly.  Smaller portions are great and kids will love the smaller size, too.

Sweets are great in small doses. For me, I loved apple crisp because I could detect the slightest hint of cinnamon and the crunchy topping was great even though my taste buds were on the fritz thanks to Taxol.  Keep them small, e.g., smaller cookies or slices of pies/tarts. One of my gal pals made triple chocolate cookies with a cake mix and my son loved them so there’s no need to spend lots of time making things from scratch if that’s not your thing.

If you can afford it, please purchase organic and local food.  Organic is better for all of us and if it’s local, the food will be fresher and is oftentimes a much better quality than you will find in the big grocery stores.

Hydration and protein are very important.  Chemo is terrible on the kidneys and it also breaks down healthy cells so hydration and protein are important at every meal if possible.  Water tasted terrible to me but I found that a mild coconut water was tolerable.  If cooking isn’t your thing, buy some small boxes of coconut water or your patient’s beverage of choice.  Include some small protein-packed smoothies (Odwalla and Naked make some good ones) that can be kept in the refrigerator.

Lastly, I want to say how grateful I was to have food brought to my house. Several people pitched in and provided meals for us throughout my chemo  and having those meals ready to go with minimal prep was truly a blessing.  We preferred those to the heavily processed frozen foods in the grocery store.  Don’t ask for permission – just do it.  Whatever you decide to prepare or purchase will be very much appreciated by the patient and caregivers.

Charlie Brown

Musings on a Sunday in a post-cancer world

I am entering my 2nd month of being in remission and it feels wonderful.  However, cancer and chemo have lasting effects.  They don’t necessarily have to be permanent but they indeed make their presence known even after treatment is over.  For instance, I made it through 6 cycles/18 straight weeks of chemotherapy without any neuropathy.  Four days after my last treatment, the neuropathy hit my fingers and toes.  I am fortunate to have access to the wonderful resources in my oncologist’s office.  She has a nurse practitioner who is well-versed in complementary medicine and she advised that some particular vitamins may help increase the circulation for me.  My fingers have gotten better and I’m still hoping the toes improve. In the meantime, I try and stay active and do foot exercises to keep the blood moving.

I mentioned that the neuropathy is still an issue to my oncologist earlier this week when I saw her (I see her every three weeks due to clinical trial protocol).  I also mentioned that ever since chemo, my balance has been a bit “off” and I feel a bit unsteady at times.  Between that and the neuropathy, sometimes I look a bit lopsided when I’m walking.  I asked if physical therapy might be helpful and she was completely honest with me.  She said, “I think oftentimes that physical therapy is overlooked and not asked for when it can be helpful.  I have no problem recommending this for you because it could be very beneficial.”   I felt relieved and I was very glad that I’d spoken up.  I’ve mentioned this before but it is so important to speak up, ask questions, and ask for help if it’s needed.  There is no reason to feel embarrassed in speaking up.

I also had another lesson in humility today. (Now, don’t get the idea that I’m a mower and trimmer and gardener because I’m not – I’ve gladly let the menfolk in my life take care of most of that.  They were around today, too, but we were all going off in different directions taking care of stuff.)  I was outside working in the yard and some neighbors pulled up with equipment and smiles.  The lady jumped out of the vehicle and said, “Many hands make light work!” and with that, her family unloaded the trailer of lawn equipment and got to work.  In less than an hour, my yard was mowed and trimmed.  When they showed up, I was brought to tears due to their generosity.  When they left, I again got teary-eyed.  I am so blessed to have such generous people in my life.  I am also humbled by the fact that my strength and endurance are still coming back and I still cannot do as much work as I did before cancer hit me.  I have to take more breaks to rest and catch my breath.

Lastly, the kiddo is going to prom next week.  THIS has made me feel old.  We went shopping today for “prom attire” and although in the end it was a successful venture, it indeed wore me out both physically and mentally even though we were only in one store.  In an effort to find slacks, a blazer, and dress shoes, the teenage attitude came out and it was exhausting to me.  An hour and a half later – still in the same store – we left with our purchases.

As I reflect on the day, I am so glad to be in remission to be able to accept neighborly help and to tolerate the teenage attitude when it rears its ugly head.  Since being diagnosed with cancer, I have never had a bad day.  I have good days and I have great days.  Today will fall under one of those great days.

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