Advocacy Opportunity: Participating in the American Association for Cancer Research Scientist Survivor Program

As a recurrent ovarian cancer thriver/survivor who is still undergoing chemotherapy after being originally diagnosed almost eight years ago,  I have volunteered in various forms of advocacy including: 

  • Several opportunities with the Ovarian Cancer Research Alliance as an Advocate Leader in 2014 and 2019, as a presenter with Survivors Teaching Students® program, and as a research advocate. 
  • I have also been a consumer reviewer with the Department of Defense CDMRP Ovarian Cancer Research Program
  • I am a member of the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship Cancer Policy & Advocacy Team
  • I participated in the American Association for Cancer Research Scientist <-> Survivor Program in 2015 and was selected again this year as a survivor advocate which was a great opportunity for me to continue to learn about research advocacy. 

This year’s American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) annual conference was held in Atlanta with more than 22,000 researchers, scientists,  advocates, and attendees. It focused largely patient-targeted therapies including genome sequencing and immunotherapy as well as clinical trials. The conference spanned five days of presentations and workshops. 

A bit about the history of the AACR and the Scientist<->Survivor Program:

  • “The AACR was founded in 1907 by a group of 11 physicians and scientists interested in research, “to further the investigation and spread the knowledge of cancer.” Today, the AACR accelerates progress toward the prevention and cure of cancer by promoting research, education, communication, and collaboration.” – from the aacr.org website 
  • The Scientist<->Survivor Program began in 1999.  “Through our program, survivor and patient advocates are able to develop stronger backgrounds in cancer research and related issues; keep abreast of recent advances in drug development and basic, clinical and translational cancer research; and be exposed to the knowledge and dedication of cancer scientists.” – from accr.org website.

Some details from year’s conference:

One of the main goals of participating in the Scientist<->Survivor Program is being assigned to small working groups to work on a particular question as it relates to cancer, research, precision medicine, etc.  Within each group are cancer survivors, patient advocates, and each group has at least one scientist who is available to help make sense out of all of the science/research lingo that is prevalent when so many researchers are gathered in one place to share information. At the end of the conference, each working group puts together a presentation to share with all of the other working groups participating in the program.  This project takes a lot of time yet it is fun to work together to find the answers throughout the conference whether it is from presentations, panels, posters, and/or the amazing availability of all of the exhibitors who have a lot of information that they are willing to share. 

As a participant in the Scientist-Survivor Program, we are required to present a poster during one of the advocate poster sessions. We had the opportunity to speak to people who stopped by to look at our posters and ask questions. My poster was about the decision-making process that a patient goes through when choosing to go into a clinical trial or not. I have participated in four clinical trials over the years since my original diagnosis so this topic is very close to my heart. Some of the details included in the poster were how to find clinical trials, how to navigate the details, financial considerations, and how to potentially stay eligible for more clinical trials. I had lots of researchers interested in my poster because accrual for clinical trials can be a challenge.  I enjoyed speaking with them about their challenges as well as sharing the challenges that patients face when trying to decide to go into a clinical trial or how to qualify for a clinical trial.  

Unfortunately, precision medicine and targeted therapies are not an option for all cancer patients due to the complexities of cancer as well as the complexities of each patient’s response to therapies.  There is still much work to be done yet what I witnessed at this conference is that researchers are sharing more information and using opportunities to collaborate to make as much progress as possible so that people can live longer after being diagnosed with cancer. They are also very interested in the patient perspective and are including them when designing research opportunities.

What I enjoyed the most, though, was meeting other cancer survivors and advocates from all over the world.  Within my working group, multiple cancers were represented including ovarian, brain, pediatric, lung, and breast with survivors and advocates from all over the United States as well as Canada and Kenya.  There is amazing strength and compassion throughout the world when it comes to cancer, new research, and the people it affects.

 

AACR.org

AACR Scientist<->Survivor Program Info

 

Atlanta, GA – The AACR 2019 Annual Meeting – Attendees during SSP Closing Session & Celebration at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting here today, Tuesday April 2, 2019. More than 20,000 physicians, researchers, health care professionals, cancer survivors and patient advocates are expected to attend the meeting at the Georgia World Congress Center. The Annual Meeting highlights the latest findings in all major areas of cancer research from basic through clinical and epidemiological studies. Photo by © AACR/Phil McCarten 2019 Contact Info: todd@medmeetingimages.com Keywords: Attendees – SSP Closing Session & Celebration

Nine Lessons I Have Learned as a Cancer Survivor

It’s National Cancer Survivors’ Day. There are so many of us that have defied the statistics and are still here.

Here are some things that I have learned over the years:

1.)  I have learned about the kindness of strangers. Truly.  Most people are kind, especially in the world that is cancer.  I was told to stay off the internet after being diagnosed (too much scary info), but I knew I needed support. I went looking for it online because “in-person” support is lacking in my immediate community.

The kindness of strangers shaped how I handled and navigated my diagnosis from the beginning. Those ladies shared information at all hours of the day and night by telling me to become knowledgeable about my disease, telling me that clinical trials are not a last resort (they are often a “first resort” as mine was), telling me that it’s possible to live with cancer, etc.

I believe with my whole heart that I would not still be here without their unselfish sharing of information during the early days of my diagnosis and their willingness to continue to share information today. This is one of the “positives” of social media – being able to connect with others. I try to give back and share as much as I can.

2.)  The medical community can only do so much.  I learned early on in my diagnosis, thanks to the advice of others, to plug in and participate in my healthcare as well by:

Talking to other survivors.
Learning about reliable research about the disease.
Being knowledgeable about the disease, know how it behaves, and learn what treatments might work.
Engaging in respectful conversation with the oncologist.

For additional information on questions to ask your oncologist, please click here.

Anyone who knows me knows that I’m just too stubborn to let cancer take my life.

3.)  I have learned who my “real” friends are and that’s o.k.  It sucks to have cancer and it sucks to watch someone go through it. There’s no rule book on how to handle all of it so when people exit my life, I harbor no ill will.
I will, however, offer those people my support should they need it in the future because dealing with a chronic disease can be lonely.

4.)  I have learned what truly matters and what does not. I am blessed to have the consistent support of my sweetie and my son. It must really suck to see me day in and day out and not be able to “fix” the cancer. A lot of people do not have this kind of support or their support goes away which is very sad.  My “to do” list can wait because I’d rather enjoy the simple things like taking a walk at the harbor, going to a Sox game,or enjoying a home-cooked meal with loved ones.

Heck, I even threw in a Boston Marathon two years ago and was the very last to finish but I didn’t care because I finished that darn course and got the same medal as everyone else.

 

5.)  I have learned that statistics are just that – silly numbers.  I’m more than a statistic and I have proven the statistics wrong.

6.)  Life is much too short to NOT enjoy it.

Cancer may sap my strength, sleep, and appetite but it has never taken my hope.

7.) Although I am terribly introverted, I enjoy being an advocate for the ovarian cancer community.
I am still finding my way to find my strengths in the advocate world but at the very least, what I enjoy most is sharing my story with new medical professionals.  This gives me the hope they will diagnose ovarian cancer at earlier stages when women come to them looking for answers for the symptoms they have.

I’m in there, I promise!

Sen. Collins and myself (2019)

On a whim and because some other survivors talked me into this, “introverted me” ended up on Capitol Hill for the first time in 2012 to share my story and ask for MILLIONS of dollars for research and awareness campaigns.
Little did I know that I would continue to go back again and again after that very first time.
I have learned that going to Capitol Hill and maintaining a relationship with the offices of my elected officials really does make a difference.
I am often the only person in Maine advocating for research dollars for ovarian cancer but I am blessed to be able to rally others across multiple states (including Maine) who are willing to reach out to their elected officials’ offices as well to make a difference.

8.)  ALL RESEARCH MATTERS and ALL RESEARCH CAN HELP MULTIPLE CANCERS because of commonalities in cell types, pathways, proteins, etc. (it’s not just about the location of the cancer anymore).

9.) And perhaps most of all, I have learned that there is a “new” normal after cancer and it’s ever-changing.
It does not mean that my life is any better or worse than before cancer; it’s just that it is different and it winds down a different path.
I have many more physical scars from the multiple surgeries.
My belly button moves a bit after each surgery.
I have a “front butt” thanks to the surgeries (that surgical cut down the front creates “cheeks” on either side when the incision is closed).
My hairstyles have changed through the years not necessarily because I like to change it up but because of chemotherapy and its side effects.
Right now, my current look mimics John Madden’s ‘do from back-in-the-day. It’s the best I can do right now and that is o.k.
I may not be able to do some things that I was able to do before cancer like go non-stop for hours and hours whether it’s walking, working in the yard, working too many hours at my job, etc.
I need to rest more but that’s totally o.k. I just take life at a slower pace now and I’m happy with that.
It’s just all a part of the “new” normal.

I just keep on keepin’ on because it is what I know how to do.

 

 

 

 

Advocate Leaders 2019

Front row: Diane Riche (ovariancancer101.org and OCRA 2019 Advocate Leader for Massachusetts), Frieda Weeks (hopeforheather.org and OCRA 2019 Advocate Leader for New York), Shannon Routh (tealdiva.org and OCRA 2019 Advocate Leader for North Carolina)
Second row: Jill Tanner (OCRA 2019 Advocate Leader for Kentucky) , Melissa Kritzell (OCRA 2019 Advocate Leader for Ohio), Terri Gerace (OCRA 2019 Advocate Leader for Louisiana)
Back row: me (OCRA 2019 Advocate Leader for Maine), Kathleen Maxian (ovariancancerproject.org and OCRA 2019 Advocate Leader for New York)

For more information on ovarian cancer resources, check out:

TealDiva.org

OvarianCancer101.org

HopeForHeather.org

OvarianCancerProject.org

ORCAHope.org

Snappy Satan vs. Chemo

I’ve been told on more than one occasion that I become “Snappy Satan” when I’m on chemo. Ok, so let’s examine the facts (in no particular order):

I’m mad that my own body is trying to kill me because it doesn’t recognize cancer as a foreign entity.

I’m mad that for the last 7 years, I’ve been in treatment longer than I’ve been in remission.

I’m mad that I may not see my son graduate from college and have a career as well as him maybe finding a wife and having some kids.

I’m mad that before I get dressed each day, my wardrobe is affected by the fact that I need to remember whether my port is being accessed or if I’m having blood work done at the local hospital. I very rarely get to wear sweaters because of this conundrum.

I’m mad that I need to drive nearly two hours each way to be treated for my cancer because it’s not an “average” cancer that a general oncologist can treat just a mere 5 minutes away.

I’m mad that I have virtually no appetite.

I’m mad that food doesn’t taste good.

I’m mad that taking a shower completely wipes me out. For that matter, just brushing my teeth takes a lot out of me, too.

I’m mad that I get tired easily.

I’m mad that I can’t sleep well.

I’m mad that I sleep too much (not quality sleep).

I’m mad that my family and close friends feel helpless at times because that’s what cancer does – it socks everyone in the stomach and most folks fall to their knees because cancer is just that mean and brutal. Whether it’s the first diagnosis or any number of recurrences, it all sucks for everyone involved.

I’m mad that there isn’t an adequate support group available less than 2 hours away.

I’m mad that there’s no early detection test for ovarian cancer because ovarian cancer is actually a bunch of different messed-up cell types and subtypes.

I’m mad that I can cry for apparently no obvious reason.

I’m mad that anxiety hits me out of the blue when I least expect it.

I’m mad that this cancer knows no age limits and has taken a lot of fabulous women in this world far too soon.

I’m mad that I’m not able to support those around me like I’d like to because I’m just too tired.

I’m mad I’m not able to get out and go snow shoeing or hiking like I used to. Heck, I’m mad that I struggle to walk to the cul-de-sac and back.

I’m mad that I can’t focus long enough to read a magazine article, much less a book.

I’m mad that I need to keep changing chemo treatments because this cancer just goes rogue and multiplies when it wants to.

And then there’s the chemo itself. This is poison that is put into my body while the nurse has gloves, a mask, and a disposable coverup on while I get infused while wearing my regular clothes. This poison isn’t smart enough to look for only the cancer cells. It attacks all rapidly dividing cells which includes healthy cells (thus the loss of hair sometimes). And no doubt it likely affects one’s mood as well.

One thing I’m proud to say is that I’ve never once wondered, “Why, me?” The thought has truly never crossed my mind. I am a genetic mutant (BRCA1+) and thus not surprised with the cards I’ve been dealt. But I can still be mad that this damn cancer still hasn’t learned how strong this gal is and I can be mad that this damn cancer seems to love a good fight.

So yeah, I’m not really surprised that I may snap from time-to-time in looking over the above list. I probably am “Snappy Satan” and if anyone gets offended with my short and direct manner, I will apologize here in advance. It’s not who I want to be. It’s not really you that I’m mad at because I have a long of other things to be mad about. It’s just really hard to keep it all together sometimes.

Thank you to those who have stuck around even in the presence of “Snappy Satan.” I appreciate you. 💜

 

A Different Approach to Gift Giving This Holiday Season

This blog was created to document different details about my cancer journey.  One of the things that cancer has taught me is what really matters to me and what really doesn’t.  The holiday season is upon us and thus the relentless purchasing of gifts shifts into high gear. There is Black Friday, Small Business Saturday, a Cyber Monday.  I have nothing against giving a few gifts if people want to.  Unfortunately, it’s become more about feeling obligated to purchase gifts for some people which then creates unnecessary stress.

Today is Giving Tuesday which helped nudge me to pen this post. The amount of gifts that are given – especially to children – as well as the accompanying price tags is disheartening to me. I feel saddened instead because this season is not about the price or the number of gifts.  Each year, I hear friends say, “We have budgeted “X” dollars for each of our kids for Christmas (I often hear anywhere from $200-500 per child) and then we have the rest of the family to buy gifts for.”  I’m not sure what compels people to tell each other how much they are spending but I, for one, am not impressed when I hear the dollar amount.  What happens with these expenses instead is that kids get so many gifts that not much really means anything to them.  In fact, you’ll often find these stacks of gifts in a yard sale in 6 months.  Do your kids remember what gifts they unwrapped last year?  Do you remember what you received? How about the year before?

The commercialization of the holiday season benefits no one other than the retailers who increase their bottom line.  In the old days, people focused on creating memories and/or helping others rather than the purchase of gifts.

How about changing things up this year?  A new idea would be to allocate the money differently and it could be:

  • used to go somewhere to create new memories with the family – hiking, camping, visiting a state park or national park, etc.
  • used to fly in family or friends to create new memories
  • used to register everyone for a local charity 5K race/kids’ fun run.  Make it fun and take a lot of photos.
  • donated to a worthy charity or medical research in the name of each recipient
  • If gifts must be purchased, try the 3 gifts per child/person rule:
    • 1 they need
    • 1 to read
    • 1 to wear
  • Or forgo the money altogether and agree to make hand-made gifts for one another, play some new or old board games, and donate time together – as a family – to help others:
    • wrapping gifts for underprivileged children
    • helping a local church or community charity to serve a holiday meal to those less fortunate
    • donating time with a local Habitat for Humanity to help build a home
    • having the entire family go out one day and shovel some of the neighbors’ sidewalks and driveways (if you live in a snowy area)
    • visiting nursing homes and sing Christmas carols off-key (always appreciated by the residents)
    • visiting a children’s hospital and bring some homemade gifts
    • cooking a meal and take it to a neighbor who may live alone or better yet, invite that neighbor over for dinner
    • baking some cookies or brownies together and then take them to a local fire station or police station on Christmas to share with those who are working and keeping your community safe

Growing up, what I remember most is spending time with my grandparents and extended family in my grandparents’ home in Tennessee. We would gather in the kitchen and help prepare meals, we sat around the dining room table and chatted (this was long before cell phones were around), and we also went through the extra “stuff” around the house each year to donate to a local charity.  We had a blast spending time together.  Those memories mean more to me than any gift I ever unwrapped.

Instead of spending the money “just because” it is in the budget or because you have the financial means to do so, maybe it is time to think outside the box this year and do things a little differently.

Make some gifts.

Create some memories.  

Help others while doing so.

Those will be what everyone remembers from year-to-year and those are the real gifts that will be cherished.

Dear Friend with Cancer

Dear Friend with Cancer,

Cancer sucks.  Period.  We both have it and we both have recurred twice.  There will likely be no long remissions for either one of us but one thing I know for sure:  we can LIVE with cancer.  That’s right.  We can live with it because it can be treated like other chronic illnesses such as diabetes.

Sure, chemo sucks, but it can work to prolong our lives.  There may also be clinical trials that might help.  However, nothing will work if we are not ‘plugged in’ and are not being an active participant in our medical journey.  I am a firm believer that attitude is at least half the battle if not more.  Without a positive attitude most of the time, our life becomes very short.  (It’s o.k. to have sad days as long as we don’t unpack and stay there.)

Unfortunately, with this latest recurrence, it looks like you have given up hope and there’s not a single thing I can do about it.   I am not scolding you in any way, I assure you.  I am merely stating my observation from the perspective of someone who cares about you.

To all the ladies out there dealing with ovarian cancer, support is available either in person or via phone, email, or the internet:

SHARE – this organization has a hotline that you can call at any time and speak with a trained fellow survivor.

Woman to Woman – this organization is a partnership between QVC  and the Ovarian Cancer Research Fund Alliance.  It is in several hospitals around the country and also provides support to women diagnosed with ovarian cancer.

Ovarian Cancer Resources – these organizations are partner members with the Ovarian Cancer Research Fund Alliance.  Many have support groups available.

In my state, we are fortunate to have the Patrick Dempsey Center for Cancer Hope and Healing.  This organization provides support, exercise, nutrition, crafts, etc., to cancer patients, their families, and their caregivers FOR FREE.  It’s an amazing organization that I drive two hours each way so that I can go there for my own support as well as for my son.

My sweet friend, so many people love you and care about you.   I have never felt so helpless as I do right now.  There is support available and I hope you will reach out. No one gets through cancer alone.

34ba23d3a5f75f894f80f50186649540

It’s OK to Advocate for Yourself

Throughout the last 5+ years, I have learned a lot about advocating for the ovarian cancer community: I have been to Capitol Hill several times to ask for research for dollars for better treatments and an early detection test, I have participated in the American Association for Cancer Research Survivor Scientist Program, I have been a consumer reviewer for potential innovative research, and I am a presenter with Survivors Teaching Students® where we speak with 3rd-year medical students, physicians’ assistant students, and nursing students about our stories in the hopes that they will refer patients who present with symptoms to a gynecologic oncologist so that if ovarian cancer is present, it will be diagnosed at an earlier stage.

In these past few years, I have also learned to advocate for myself especially when it comes to healthcare.  For example:

  • During my frontline chemotherapy treatments, the infusion center where I was initially sent was being remodeled.  The temporary setup was not ideal:  patients were packed in like sardines, there was absolutely no privacy in conversations because the arms of the most uncomfortable chairs were touching the next patient’s chair, and my first treatment included the nurse seating me and then going to lunch for an hour so no one checked on me or explained what was happening. When I finally received chemotherapy, I felt like I was not a person at all  – I was merely “a port access” and no one looked me in the eyes to tell me what was happening or how long it would last.  I was already terrified to receive chemotherapy and by the time I left, I was so stressed about this experience that when I saw my oncologist the following week, I told her about my experience and I asked if there was another location for chemotherapy where I would be treated a person first and patient second.  She was wonderfully supportive and found me another place to receive chemotherapy for the duration of my treatments.
    • The “takeaway” is:  Express your concerns and ask for what you want/need. Do not suffer in silence.
  • I am a supporter of clinical trials; however, they are often an administrative nightmare for the patient who is already stressed but then must take on the role of communicating between the various parties involved.  If your oncologist is also facilitating the clinical trial, things tend to run much smoother.  I have experienced the smoother option as well as the administrative nightmare but patients still need to advocate for themselves if they really want in a trial.  Be the squeaky wheel because time is often a stringent guideline to get in to one.  At the same time, if the trial is not meeting the patient’s needs, it is o.k. to voluntarily leave a trial.  I did this a few years ago when I was in a maintenance trial in Boston. There was ZERO communication within that facility, my calendar for trial tests was wrong (they wanted to do tests that didn’t need to be done because it was on the calendar in error) and I pointed it out every week, then every month, and no one took responsibility.  I had to physically carry information from one desk to another in the same office.  I also did not receive the travel reimbursement that the clinical trial covered although I asked about it every time I went. After 5 months, I told the Boston doctor that I was going back home for follow-up care. I told her that this was a “world-class” hospital but that does not mean that treatment and care is any less stressful if the patient has to do other people’s work.   She agreed that there were issues – because I had been bringing them up at every visit – but did not seem concerned enough to try and fix it.
    • The “takeaway” is: Just because it’s a world-class hospital and has a great reputation does not mean that it will do everything it can to ease your stress as a cancer patient.  Tell them what you want/need and if they won’t fix it, it’s o.k. to go elsewhere.  (I did eventually receive my travel reimbursements but it took a very long time and I had to keep asking every week.)
  • If you have scans or tests done, do not leave it up to the doctor’s office to call you.  I know too many people who “fell through the cracks” and did not receive the call-back for mammograms, etc.  Call the office.
    • The “takeaway” is:  Be the squeaky wheel.  It’s your health that is at stake.  Keep calling until you get answers.
  • Second opinions are totally o.k. to seek out.  I have a terrific gynecologic oncologist in my home state who facilitates clinical trials.  However, there was one that I really wanted to get into (I’ve been in 4 different trials thus far) that was in Boston.  I went to Boston last fall and it was determined that the trial may not be my best option so we pursued traditional chemotherapy in the hopes of shrinking the rogue tumor and then perhaps I could get into a different trial.  The tumor stopped responding to chemotherapy and the Boston physicians recommended surgery with a particular surgeon.  I was not in favor of this ( I had already had two other tumor debulking surgeries at this point and really did not want another surgery) but I had a consultation with that surgeon who was terrific.  However, he was a GI surgeon and not a gynecologic oncologist. I am very knowledgeable about how my cancer grows and oftentimes there are small tumors in my pelvic region that do not show up on scans.   Therefore, I wanted a gynecologic oncologist in the OR just in case he/she determined that the scheduled surgical procedure may not be the best option once he/she looked around after the initial cut.  My Boston physician would not be there and the GI surgeon did not think it was necessary.  My “gut” feeling was that this was not the way to go.  Again, even though Boston has world-class hospitals with world-class physicians, it was not the best option for me.  I went back home and met with my gynecologic oncologist as well as a surgical oncologist that she recommended.  I felt so much better about their approach and scheduled the surgery with both of them in the OR with the gynecologic oncologist “driving” the surgery.   In the interest of full disclosure, the surgery ended up being the same that Boston would have done. However, I would not have that piece of mind of a gynecologic oncologist looking around at the beginning of the surgery to see if there were any more tumors lurking about or to change plans if need be.
    • The “takeaway” is:  Be knowledgeable about your illness.  Listen to your gut. It’s o.k. to get second opinions. Do not worry about hurting anyone’s feelings because it’s YOUR body and YOUR life.

Whether it’s cancer or another chronic illness, be knowledgeable and ask for what you need.  If you are not getting what you need or are not getting answers from your current physician, find another one who believes in patient-centered care.  That is where you will find the best care for YOU.

Self Advocacy PostIt

What the Dempsey Center and Dempsey Challenge mean to me (Hint: They are tops on my list!)

When it comes to ovarian cancer, statistics show that only 40-45% of women will survive five years after diagnosis because it is usually diagnosed at a late stage.  Those statistics suck.  Period.  My grandmother passed within months of being diagnosed.  I have a cousin who passed after battling for 3 1/2 years.  I am losing friends every week to this insidious disease. It is a sad reality of ovarian cancer – we need an early detection test and we need better treatments.  In the meantime, how does a woman navigate through this journey with support and hope?

In one month, it will be five years since I was diagnosed with ovarian cancer.  Today, I am still battling it for the 3rd time (almost a year this time around).  If it were not for the support of other survivors, many of whom I have not met in person, I would not have made it this far.  They provide information, support, what-to-do/what-not-to-do advice, and they are always available at any time of the day or night thanks to the internet.

Throughout this time, I have also been blessed to have The Patrick Dempsey Center for Cancer Hope & Healing  available to me as well as to my family as a wonderful resource for support, exercise, cooking, crafting, etc., and all of this is provided for FREE because, well, cancer is just STUPID EXPENSIVE.  Most of the funding to provide these services comes through the annual Dempsey Challenge  where 100% of the funds raised go directly to the Center.  It’s a lengthy drive for me but it is very much worth it and I will keep going because of everything that the Center offers.

With any luck, I will hit that five-year mark next month and I want to celebrate BIG TIME.  I am not planning on any trips or large purchases (other than a bit of remodeling at home). This will also be my 5th year to participate in the Dempsey Challenge on October 1st-2nd and I want to raise a lot of money for this place.  It has been good to me and it is has been an amazing resource for my son.

I want to give back to say thank you, thank you, thank you!  I have set a big goal and I think I can do it.  No amount is too small to make a difference.  For every $25 donated, I will donate a crocheted chemo cap to the Dempsey Center that will be available for cancer patients.  All donations are tax-deductible and you can donate by going to my personal fundraising page.

All cancers matter and no one gets through cancer alone.  Thank you for your support!!!

CancerRibbons

 

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