What Will Your Dash Be?

No one knows how long we have but we should make the best of the time we do have. Life cannot be taken for granted. What will your dash be? You know – the dash between your birth date and the date of your death. It’s been a while since I’ve written a post and this is because my cancer came back. I again went through chemo and am now in a clinical trial with an oral medication that will hopefully prevent recurrence. While dealing with the “feeling like I’ve been hit in the gut again” emotions that go along with being told that the cancer was back, I took a good hard look at what my purpose must be to keep going through this. Some people say that I’m an inspiration, some say that I’m tough, and some people just don’t talk to me because they don’t know what to say.

Growing up, I was quite introverted and preferred to mingle with the wallpaper rather than talk to people. As I became an adult, I found myself working in jobs that required conversation with people and that helped break me out of my shell. After being diagnosed with cancer the first time, I truly didn’t care about being shy any longer. If nothing else – besides being a mom which is my greatest accomplishment – I think that one thing I have done is to try and raise awareness about ovarian cancer to anyone who will listen. My passion is advocacy. I have been to Capitol Hill four times in the last 2 1/2 years to talk to legislators. I have sent emails to legislators. I have spoken to nursing students as a part of the Survivors Teaching Students ® program to help change the medical profession’s outdated views on ovarian cancer. I have been interviewed by the local news. I next want to get involved in research advocacy because honestly, we need an early detection test and we need better treatment options.

What motivates me is that I don’t ever want any other woman to go through ovarian cancer. Sadly, many women do. My cancer is caused by a genetic mutation which runs rampant through one side of my family. I have been blessed by the kindness of strangers – thanks to the internet – to find support, knowledge, and strength to get through this insidious disease. Most women in my family have had breast cancer or ovarian cancer or both. One of those was a distant cousin that I met through email because we both battled ovarian cancer – her first, then me. Then she recurred, then I did. We exchanged emails about our treatments and surgeries and hopes and fears. She fought for 3 1/2 years before the cancer took her life a few days ago at the age of 40. She was so young but I have no doubt that her dash tells a great story about her life which included offering me support. I know how much she loved her daughter and that she never wanted her to face cancer. And now that my cousin is gone, I will continue to advocate so that her daughter may never have to deal with ovarian cancer in her lifetime. I don’t know how long I have but I want my dash to include that I did all that I could to help the next generation of women by raising awareness about the need for research for an early detection test and patient-targeted therapies to stop cancer in its tracks.  What will your dash be?

The Dash by Linda Ellis

The Dash by Linda Ellis

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